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Sat 1st July 13.45 – 15.15

First symposium session: parallel symposia

 

Symposia 7.1 Infant attachment security correlates, continuity and outcomes, and the influence of stress on care-giving sensitivity: New meta-analytic evidence
Infant attachment security as a developmental indicator of psychosocial adjustment in childhood: A prognostic systematic review and meta-analysis

Early Childhood Attachment Stability: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Couple relationship quality and offspring attachment security: A systematic review and metaanalysis

Ecological stress and maternal sensitivity: a meta-analytic review of stress associations with the Maternal Behaviour Q-Sort in infant observational studies

Symposia 7.2 Insights from Meta-analytic and Intervention Studies of the Association between Attachment and Depression across Development
The Link between Adult Attachment Security and Depression: A Meta-Analysis Stability and Change in the AAI in a Comparative Efficacy Trial for Depressed and Suicidal Adolescents

Maternal Depression and Maternal Sensitivity during Infancy: Results of a Meta-Analysis

Insights from Meta-analytic and Intervention Studies of the Association between Attachment and Depression across Development

Symposia 7.3 Children’s safety & the Courts: The uncomfortable intersection of developmental science and judicial decision-making for children and families at highest risk
Beyond the best interests of the child

Safety and permanency planning for children and families coping with abuse and neglect: The struggle to apply attachment theory and research to inform lifetime-impacting decisions.

Attachment theory in the service of the court system: Contributions and risks

Symposia 7.4 Who benefits from psychoanalytic Parent-Infant Psychotherapy and in what way? Primary and Secondary findings from a randomized controlled trial of Parent-Infant Psychotherapy for parents with mental health problems and their infants
Randomized controlled trial of parent-infant psychotherapy for parents with mental health problems and their young infants: Findings from the main trial

“What support would you find helpful?’ The influence of treatment expectations on engagement and outcomes in parent-infant psychotherapy (PIP)

Who should be targeted? Secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial that evaluates the effectiveness of parent-infant psychotherapy (PIP) for mothers with mental health problems and their infants.

Symposia 7.5 Historical perspectives on Attachment Theory
Relevance of Bowlby's WHO report in the development of attachment theory "Bowlby's own trauma history and creativity"

From Secure Dependency to Attachment: Mary Ainsworth’s integration of Blatz’s Security Theory into Bowlby’s Attachment Theory